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4:54pm August 30, 2014
4:53pm August 30, 2014

yall-mothafuckas-need-misha:

lucidlecter:

i-dislike-tea:

kimpossibooty:

People don’t appreciate enough that Hogwarts had a giant squid in the lake. Not another magical beast. Not even a normal squid with magical properties. They just had a straight up giant squid in the lake and everyone was cool about it.

How did it even get there

Hagrid, probably

Hagrid, definitely

Actually, Luna’s dad put it there as a first year. He’d caught the squid during summer vacation and he smuggled it into Hogwarts to be his familiar, but when Filch found out he was told to release it. Not wanting to be parted from his friend, he released it into the Black Lake. 

4:51pm August 30, 2014

dangerhamster:

JACK HARKNESS MEETING BUCKY AND STEVE IN THE 1940s AND FLIRTING FURIOUSLY WITH BOTH OF THEM

JACK HARKNESS SEEING THEM AGAIN IN THE 21ST CENTURY AND THEY’RE ALL EQUALLY CONFUSED AS EACH OTHER

4:50pm August 30, 2014

avelera:

I am now convinced that no modern AU Thorin is complete without an embarrassing 80s punk phase that he vehemently denies ever existed and you’ll never know for certain will you because all the photos were burned

until Fili and Kili unearth an old photo album at Dwalin’s and see the two of them, complete with Dwalin’s mohawk and Thorin’s guyliner and leather trousers, lounging against a wall like they’re the coolest 16 year olds in school

4:50pm August 30, 2014

startwithaseed:

urbansoulfarmer:

How to Cut a Rosemary Bush Stem to Grow a New Bush : The Chef’s Garden

How time, I’m going to be doing this day. I hope I can get my cuttings to root.

4:50pm August 30, 2014

When I feel like I should really leave my apartment and be a part of the world, but then I’m reading a really good book

lifeinsmallpresspublishing:

image

4:47pm August 30, 2014
nprglobalhealth:

Rice Bucket Challenge: Put Rice In Bucket, Do Not Pour Over Head
There’s the Ice Bucket Challenge. And now there’s the Rice Bucket Challenge.
More than a million people worldwide have poured buckets of ice water over their heads as part of a fund-raising campaign for ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s disease.
But when word of the challenge made its way to India, where more than 100 million people lack access to clean drinking water, locals weren’t exactly eager to drench themselves with the scarce supply.
And so, a spinoff was born.
Manju Kalanidhi, a 38-year-old journalist from Hyderabad who reports on the global rice market, put her own twist on the challenge. She calls her version the Rice Bucket Challenge, but don’t worry, no grains of rice went to waste.
Instead, they went to the hungry.
"I personally think the [Ice Bucket Challenge] is ideal for the American demographic," she says. "But in India, we have loads of other causes to promote."
Kalanidhi came up with a desi version — that’s a Hindi word to describe something Indian. She chose to focus on hunger. A third of India’s 1.2 billion people live on less than $1.25 USD a day, and a kilogram of rice, or 2 pounds, costs between 80 cents and a dollar. A family of four would go through roughly 45 pounds of rice a month, she says.
That’s why she’s challenging people to give a bucket of rice, cooked or uncooked, to a person in need. Snap a photo, share it online and, just as with the Ice Bucket Challenge, nominate friends to take part, she suggests. For those who want to help more than one person at a time, she recommends donating to a food charity.
Continue reading.
Photo: Rice is just as nice as ice when it comes to bucket challenges. Right: Manju Latha Kalanidhi, creator of the Rice Bucket Challenge, gives grains to a hard-working neighbor. (Courtesy of Manju Latha Kalanidhi)

nprglobalhealth:

Rice Bucket Challenge: Put Rice In Bucket, Do Not Pour Over Head

There’s the Ice Bucket Challenge. And now there’s the Rice Bucket Challenge.

More than a million people worldwide have poured buckets of ice water over their heads as part of a fund-raising campaign for ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s disease.

But when word of the challenge made its way to India, where more than 100 million people lack access to clean drinking water, locals weren’t exactly eager to drench themselves with the scarce supply.

And so, a spinoff was born.

Manju Kalanidhi, a 38-year-old journalist from Hyderabad who reports on the global rice market, put her own twist on the challenge. She calls her version the Rice Bucket Challenge, but don’t worry, no grains of rice went to waste.

Instead, they went to the hungry.

"I personally think the [Ice Bucket Challenge] is ideal for the American demographic," she says. "But in India, we have loads of other causes to promote."

Kalanidhi came up with a desi version — that’s a Hindi word to describe something Indian. She chose to focus on hunger. A third of India’s 1.2 billion people live on less than $1.25 USD a day, and a kilogram of rice, or 2 pounds, costs between 80 cents and a dollar. A family of four would go through roughly 45 pounds of rice a month, she says.

That’s why she’s challenging people to give a bucket of rice, cooked or uncooked, to a person in need. Snap a photo, share it online and, just as with the Ice Bucket Challenge, nominate friends to take part, she suggests. For those who want to help more than one person at a time, she recommends donating to a food charity.

Continue reading.

Photo: Rice is just as nice as ice when it comes to bucket challenges. Right: Manju Latha Kalanidhi, creator of the Rice Bucket Challenge, gives grains to a hard-working neighbor. (Courtesy of Manju Latha Kalanidhi)

4:46pm August 30, 2014
backonpointe:

backonpointe:

A BackOnPointe super-original!
If you don’t have any workout equipment at home, you can still use what you have! Here’s a workout that uses a throw pillow in a few creative ways.
Repeat this workout three times through for a full workout!

I’m still really proud of this workout.

backonpointe:

backonpointe:

A BackOnPointe super-original!

If you don’t have any workout equipment at home, you can still use what you have! Here’s a workout that uses a throw pillow in a few creative ways.

Repeat this workout three times through for a full workout!

I’m still really proud of this workout.